Engineering Tourism

There are many engineering wonders in this district. A tour to those wonders will educate the visitors and help them gaining knowledge. These are of immense importance to commerce, transport and development. Besides providing knowledge and amusement, these great engineering works reveal how they helped the district to scale new heights.

RoadRail Bridge

 

ROAD CUM RAILWAY BRIDGE
It is the Asia’s third largest road cum railway bridge crossing over the beautiful river Godavari. The bridge is 4.1km long which is commissioned by South Central Railway division of Indian railways. Its construction began in the early 1970 by Braithwaite, Burn and Jessop Construction Company and was inaugurated by the then President of India, Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed in 1974 on Aug 16.

 

 

Havlock

 

THE HAVELOCK BRIDGE
This old Godavari Bridge is also known as the Havelock Bridge which served trains passing between Howrah and Madras. It is the earliest of the three bridges that span the Godavari River at Rajahmundry. The construction of the bridge commenced on Nov 11, 1897. It was named after Sir Arthur Elibank Havelock, the then Governor of Madras. Now it’s finally planned to be converted into a tourist spot.

 

ArcBridge

 

ARCH BRIDGE
The Godavari Arch Bridge was actually built to replace the Havelock Bridge. Its construction began in 1991 and lasted till 1997. It became fully operational for running trains from 2003. It is the latest of the three bridges that span the Godavari River at Rajahmundry. The bridge is located in two channels, the Kovvur channel and the Rajahmundry channel, and it is also known as the Kovvur –Rajahmundry Bridge.

 

 

FourthBridge

 

THE FOURTH BRIDGE
It is a four lane bridge and its objective is to ease traffic congestion on the existing Rail Cum Road Bridge. Due to the construction of this bridge the distance between Chennai and Kolkata has been reduced by 50km.

 

 

 

 

Cotton Barrage

 

COTTON BRIDGE
The Dowleswaram Barrage was built on the river Godavari under the supervision of a British irrigation engineer Sir Arthur Cotton in the year 1850. It is still considered as one of the engineering marvels.